moriarty-the-timetraveling-lemur:

bitchin-blaziken:

finally my search is for this gifset is over

Spencer was the only reason I watched that show

bellechere:

comicsalliance:

AVENGERS NOW: A BLACK CAPTAIN AMERICA, A FEMALE THOR, A SUPERIOR IRON MAN, AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR MARVEL AND DIVERSITY
By Andrew Wheeler
On Tuesday morning Whoopi Goldberg and the hosts of The View announced that Marvel will relaunch Thor this October with a female ‘worthy’ brandishing the hammer. Marvel followed that announcement with another high profile switcheroo on Wednesday night as Entertainment Weekly revealed a new-ish and possibly superior Iron Man, and comedian Stephen Colbert joined Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada to announce on The Colbert Report that a new guy is also going to take up Captain America’s shield.
That in itself isn’t much of a surprise — original Cap Steve Rogers has passed on his mantle a few times before before yanking it back. After spending some time in Dimension Z and whatnot, he’s now too old to Avenge from the front lines. The big reveal is that the new Captain America will be Sam Wilson, the African-American superhero currently known as Falcon.
It’s not hard to guess at Marvel’s intentions here. By announcing a female Thor and a black Captain America as a swift one-two punch, the publisher accomplishes two things. First, it shakes up its universe in a way that’s sure to garner attention — as indeed it has. Second, it makes a mission statement.
To the first point; the whole world knows Marvel’s Avengers characters now. That could be a millstone around the publisher’s neck if Marvel put the need to reflect the movies ahead of a need to tell its own stories. Marvel has certainly tried to configure Avengers comics around the on-screen characters, but to no particular success with respect to sales (certainly nothing to indicate that the Avengers are the most popular movie characters in America).
Replacing at least two of its Avengers big three — Thor, Captain America, and Iron Man — suggests Marvel’s commitment to telling its own stories, albeit in a grandstanding, headline-grabbing way. A woman taking the name and role of a male Norse god? A black man representing all of America? These are moves that upset the right people, and that guarantees attention.
Which leads in to the second point. These changes suggest an agenda. I’d call it progressive agenda, but it’s not. Putting women and people of color in key positions isn’t progressive, it’s just evidence that superhero comics are slowly catching up to the present day. It just happens that there’s a strong regressive agenda in our culture that’s resistant to that kind of change.
Marvel’s only motive here may be to stir up controversy and hope it translates to sales, but I think there’s enough evidence in the publisher’s support for books like Ms. Marvel, Captain Marvel, and Mighty Avengers, that the publisher is sincere in its efforts to reach out to audiences that traditionally haven’t been well-served by superhero comics. There’s always more work to be done, but Marvel’s output feels more inclusive with every passing quarter.
READ MUCH MORE

"Putting women and people of color in key positions isn’t progressive, it’s just evidence that superhero comics are slowly catching up to the present day."
This article brings up some great points. It makes me outright happy that a company I love and value is taking these motions, listening to their fans, and balancing the representation. I just hope they stick with it.
Make Mine Marvel.

bellechere:

comicsalliance:

AVENGERS NOW: A BLACK CAPTAIN AMERICA, A FEMALE THOR, A SUPERIOR IRON MAN, AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR MARVEL AND DIVERSITY

By Andrew Wheeler

On Tuesday morning Whoopi Goldberg and the hosts of The View announced that Marvel will relaunch Thor this October with a female ‘worthy’ brandishing the hammer. Marvel followed that announcement with another high profile switcheroo on Wednesday night as Entertainment Weekly revealed a new-ish and possibly superior Iron Man, and comedian Stephen Colbert joined Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada to announce on The Colbert Report that a new guy is also going to take up Captain America’s shield.

That in itself isn’t much of a surprise — original Cap Steve Rogers has passed on his mantle a few times before before yanking it back. After spending some time in Dimension Z and whatnot, he’s now too old to Avenge from the front lines. The big reveal is that the new Captain America will be Sam Wilson, the African-American superhero currently known as Falcon.

It’s not hard to guess at Marvel’s intentions here. By announcing a female Thor and a black Captain America as a swift one-two punch, the publisher accomplishes two things. First, it shakes up its universe in a way that’s sure to garner attention — as indeed it has. Second, it makes a mission statement.

To the first point; the whole world knows Marvel’s Avengers characters now. That could be a millstone around the publisher’s neck if Marvel put the need to reflect the movies ahead of a need to tell its own stories. Marvel has certainly tried to configure Avengers comics around the on-screen characters, but to no particular success with respect to sales (certainly nothing to indicate that the Avengers are the most popular movie characters in America).

Replacing at least two of its Avengers big three — Thor, Captain America, and Iron Man — suggests Marvel’s commitment to telling its own stories, albeit in a grandstanding, headline-grabbing way. A woman taking the name and role of a male Norse god? A black man representing all of America? These are moves that upset the right people, and that guarantees attention.

Which leads in to the second point. These changes suggest an agenda. I’d call it progressive agenda, but it’s not. Putting women and people of color in key positions isn’t progressive, it’s just evidence that superhero comics are slowly catching up to the present day. It just happens that there’s a strong regressive agenda in our culture that’s resistant to that kind of change.

Marvel’s only motive here may be to stir up controversy and hope it translates to sales, but I think there’s enough evidence in the publisher’s support for books like Ms. MarvelCaptain Marvel, and Mighty Avengers, that the publisher is sincere in its efforts to reach out to audiences that traditionally haven’t been well-served by superhero comics. There’s always more work to be done, but Marvel’s output feels more inclusive with every passing quarter.

READ MUCH MORE

"Putting women and people of color in key positions isn’t progressive, it’s just evidence that superhero comics are slowly catching up to the present day."

This article brings up some great points. It makes me outright happy that a company I love and value is taking these motions, listening to their fans, and balancing the representation. I just hope they stick with it.

Make Mine Marvel.

Spanish Hunters: We hunt those who hunt us.
Me: NO it's we protect those who cannot protect themselves
Spanish Hunters: We hunt those who hunt us, say it Chris
Chris: ...
Me: ...
Spanish Hunters: Say it Chris
Chris: ...
Spanish Hunters: ..
Me: ...
Chris: We hunt those who hunt us
Me: FUCK YOU AND YOUR GRIEF BEARD CHRIS ARGENT

badmooonrising:

*creeps back into tumblr to say*

but guys, you know how Stiles stresses he’s terrified even though he isn’t on the list?

You all know what it means right?

That he’ll be on the next list.

On the next dead pool list:

Stiles' name appears on the list; everyone looks up at him in confusion, he pretends to look just as confused but his lips slowly form into a smirk.
Void!Stiles: Well that was boring as hell, while it lasted.
Void!Stiles turns and grabs Kira's katana, and swiftly turns and stabs the two annoying ass teenage assassins, hands the katana back to Kira, wipes his hands together, and walks away like the badass bitch he is.
tori-luvs-koalas:

Uhhh WTF?!?!? Guys, help! I’m bout to die here!!!!!

tori-luvs-koalas:

Uhhh WTF?!?!? Guys, help! I’m bout to die here!!!!!

kacaution:

part 1: allison

Sean Walcott, 250K
David Walcott, 250K
Michael Walcott, 250K
Christina Walcott, 250K
Lydia Martin, 20M
Scott McCall, 25M
Demarco Montana, 250K
Derek Hale, 15M
Carrie Hudson, 500K
Kayleen Bettcher, 250k
Kira Yukimura, 6M
Elias Town, 250K

part 2: aiden

Kate Argent 12M 
Noshiko Yukimura 5M 
Joanne McLaughlin 1M 
Steve Grace 1M 
Tom Hill 1M 
Brett Talbot 1M
Richard Benefield 250k 
Jack Marsland 250k 
Joy Waldrop 250k 
Cheryl Calix 250k 
Jordan Parrish 5M

lonelystiles:

I’m so worried about Lydia bc it’s so obvious that she’s struggling with everything. Loosing Allison, fitting in with her own friends, she seems like she feels so alone, she’s trying so hard to help out and no one seems to pay any attention to her unless they need her and my heart is breaking

now that derek’s human he’s gonna need some help learning how to deal with it

stilesederek:

if only the pack had a human who could help him

oh wait

morphia-writes:

littlemoongoddess:

onemuseleft:

ittlebitz:

starrysleeper:

Wait a minute…

I have been laughing at this for hours now…

So, true story. The woman in this photo is Kendra Kaplan. Her husband was in Iraq for twelve months but the military has this thing called leave. Some of us may recognize the concept from old episodes of Star Trek. In this photo she is five months pregnant after conceiving her second child during her husband’s leave. That envelope in her hand is the ultrasound results. She waited for him to come home to find out if it was a girl or a boy.
There’s been several articles about it.The photo resulted in this woman receiving so much hate mail, from both internet cut-ups and the actual media, that she even took a paternity test and provided proof of her husband’s leave schedule. Her real life friends have stopped talking to her over these rumors.  
Oh, and by the way, that baby bump is a two year old by now. People are still shitting on this woman over a nasty internet meme two years later.
So in short, you’re mocking a faithful wife for something that isn’t any of our damn business anyway and has long since been disproven. 
Good job Internet.

Thank you for this!

Finally a rebloggable version of this idiotic post. 

morphia-writes:

littlemoongoddess:

onemuseleft:

ittlebitz:

starrysleeper:

Wait a minute…

I have been laughing at this for hours now…

So, true story. The woman in this photo is Kendra Kaplan. Her husband was in Iraq for twelve months but the military has this thing called leave. Some of us may recognize the concept from old episodes of Star Trek. In this photo she is five months pregnant after conceiving her second child during her husband’s leave. That envelope in her hand is the ultrasound results. She waited for him to come home to find out if it was a girl or a boy.

There’s been several articles about it.The photo resulted in this woman receiving so much hate mail, from both internet cut-ups and the actual media, that she even took a paternity test and provided proof of her husband’s leave schedule. Her real life friends have stopped talking to her over these rumors.  

Oh, and by the way, that baby bump is a two year old by now. People are still shitting on this woman over a nasty internet meme two years later.

So in short, you’re mocking a faithful wife for something that isn’t any of our damn business anyway and has long since been disproven. 

Good job Internet.

Thank you for this!

Finally a rebloggable version of this idiotic post. 

(Source: itscalledfashionlookitup)

prmartyls:

By far the stupidest criticism of the new Thor is ‘no where in Norse mythology is Thor a woman, stop messing with mythology.’

Right, because Norse mythology is just fucking filled with stories about Thor hanging out with Iron Man and Captain America at the Avengers Tower.

(Source: junomacguffed)

for kalea-bane

(Source: forassgard)

why-i-love-comics:

A+X #8 - “Hawkeye + Deadpool”

written by Christopher Hastings
art by Reilly Brown


Superman, black would be the coolest dude in the world. Imagine Sam Jackson in a cape. Running around. That would be a good movie.
I think what a lot of people don’t get is, these people aren’t real. If you cast a black dude as John F Kennedy, that’s wrong. If you cast a white dude as Martin Luther King, that’s wrong. These people aren’t real. The suits aren’t real. There aren’t really superheroes in the world.
At some point in time, you have to steep yourself in reality and say, ‘hey, it’s not about what they look like, it’s about casting a good actor in the role. If you’re sitting at home and you can’t see a black guy as Nick Fury, maybe there’s something wrong with you.

Superman, black would be the coolest dude in the world. Imagine Sam Jackson in a cape. Running around. That would be a good movie.

I think what a lot of people don’t get is, these people aren’t real. If you cast a black dude as John F Kennedy, that’s wrong. If you cast a white dude as Martin Luther King, that’s wrong. These people aren’t real. The suits aren’t real. There aren’t really superheroes in the world.

At some point in time, you have to steep yourself in reality and say, ‘hey, it’s not about what they look like, it’s about casting a good actor in the role. If you’re sitting at home and you can’t see a black guy as Nick Fury, maybe there’s something wrong with you.

(Source: avengerss)

theghostoflove
CREDIT